Fallout 4 Brings Mods to Consoles

Mods to Consoles

Fallout 4 is the first AAA-Title Game that has attempted to bring mods to consoles. And why shouldn’t they? They’ve had so much success with the modding community that Skyrim, to this day, is still widely played. I know at least three of my friends on Steam that still play it several hours a week, and that game is almost five years old. Don’t get me wrong, it’s not nearly as popular as it used to be, but it is still thriving. Now a lot of the community has moved on to work with Fallout, and my, how things have changed and adjusted to the current game.

Simple as it is, Bethesda has implemented an interface for mods on their own site to monitor and assist would-be developers creating content for more than just PCs. While it isn’t the most polished site, or with the most variety, it is working with less bugs than I expected. It’s a good set-up and a wonderful addition to introduce console players to the wonders of the modding community. With beta testing already underway, I can’t wait to further test how effective the new interface is and how it works for consoles.

Mods to ConsolesA drawback for the console, and modding for it, is understanding that consoles don’t quite have the power of the PC. Despite that setback, I feel that it will still have a chance to flourish and encourage more interaction between players and developers as the line continues to blur. Not only do mods enhance the game and tailor it to the individual player, they in turn invite people to share their styles with others, creating a nonverbal conversation that formerly was exclusive to PC users. I usually play on the PC myself, but the advent of this tech is one that I believe to be a potential boon to those who prefer the convenience of console.

A particular benefit of what Bethesda has done with their updated method of mods is placing the selection within the game itself as well as accessible through their own personal site ( Bethesda Workshop). It’s fairly simple for those with modding experience, although perhaps a bit more difficult for those first exploring the concept. Regardless, trial and error are a big part of mods and modding, just like it is in games themselves. I encourage all RPG players who have yet to pick up the game to do so and test it out. This type of interface is the next step to personalized gaming.

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Jonathan Stockman

Jonathan Stockman

Executive Director at Rising Shark
"You've gotta ask one question... Do you know gaming?"

No, but really, games have been his life for longer than he remembers. First game was the original Warcraft on PC, and the list goes on... and on... and on. He prefers Action-oriented RPGs with story and loves Strategy games of almost all types. If you ever spent a full day of pure gaming, then you might have something in common with this nutball.
Jonathan Stockman

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Jonathan Stockman

"You've gotta ask one question... Do you know gaming?" No, but really, games have been his life for longer than he remembers. First game was the original Warcraft on PC, and the list goes on... and on... and on. He prefers Action-oriented RPGs with story and loves Strategy games of almost all types. If you ever spent a full day of pure gaming, then you might have something in common with this nutball.

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